Poll

What did the test say your personality type was?

Supervisor (ESTJ)
0 (0%)
Inspector (ISTJ)
6 (13%)
Provider (ESFJ)
0 (0%)
Protector (ISFJ)
3 (6.5%)
Promoter (ESTP)
0 (0%)
Crafter (ISTP)
1 (2.2%)
Performer (ESFP)
0 (0%)
Composer (ISFP)
0 (0%)
Teacher (ENFJ)
0 (0%)
Counselor (INFJ)
7 (15.2%)
Champion (ENFP)
2 (4.3%)
Healer (INFP)
8 (17.4%)
Fieldmarshal (ENTJ)
0 (0%)
Mastermind (INTJ)
10 (21.7%)
Inventor (ENTP)
2 (4.3%)
Architect (INTP)
7 (15.2%)

Total Members Voted: 46

Author Topic: Personality types  (Read 17866 times)

Offline NeeNee

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Personality types
« on: January 31, 2013, 08:26:17 PM »
It's not like I didn't know most of this already, but still, it's nice when someone explains it for you. :))
http://www.carlkingdom.com/10-myths-about-introverts

EDIT:
Has anyone ever taken a Jung/Briggs Myers/Keirsey personality test? They distinguish 16 types of personalities, based on 4 different axes. Each type gets its own description, which you can find here and here. (Hint: Take the test first before looking at the results, since it might influence the way you read the questions.)

Of course, it won't work for everyone, but I think it's interesting to see how far your alleged personality type matches your actual personality. One question can change your score, so take a look at the neighbouring types too, perhaps you will find that one of them suits you better. :)
« Last Edit: February 07, 2013, 07:36:04 PM by NeeNee »

Offline earthforge

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Re: Re: Once upon a time on the internet
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2013, 08:26:21 AM »
Yargh.

I do think he's overloading introverts and autism spectrum. I have ran into people who are literally sensitive to chaos around them. I sorta am, but not to a huge degree. My autistic colleague is so sensitive that she has to get out of a crowd fast. It is likely connected to reactivity and emotional feedback.

I'm pretty sure being introverted just means that you prefer a low-key social life to a dynamic social life.

There's nothing more or less special. I still see mental disorder as mental disorder. So it means you're more susceptible to flights of insight and intelligence. It also means you're more susceptible to flights of emotion and rage. It's a disability, not a superpower.

It was hilarious to read while listening to this song.
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Offline NeeNee

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Re: Re: Once upon a time on the internet
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2013, 04:03:36 PM »
^ I don't really get what you're saying, but I sure as hell hope you're not calling being introvert a mental disability, because I'd take that as a personal insult.

FYI, here's a short description of the recognised disorders in the autism spectrum:

Autism is characterized by delays or abnormal functioning before the age of three years in one or more of the following domains: (1) social interaction; (2) communication; and (3) restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests, and activities.[9]
 
Asperger syndrome can be distinguished from autism by the lack of delay or deviance in early language development.[9] Additionally, individuals with Asperger syndrome do not have significant cognitive delays. Other symptoms include repetitive routines or rituals, peculiarities in speech and language, inappropriate affect or social behavior, problems with non-verbal communication, and clumsy or uncoordinated motor movements.[10]
 
PDD-NOS is considered "subthreshold autism" and "atypical autism" because it is often characterized by milder symptoms of autism or symptoms in only one domain (such as social difficulties).[11] Persons with PDD-NOS may demonstrate pervasive deficits in the development of reciprocal social interaction or stereotyped behaviors, but do not meet the criteria for a specific pervasive developmental disorder or other psychological disorders (such as schizophrenia or avoidant personality disorder).[9]

Yes, I do hate chaos. Yes, I need to get away from crowds. I fit every single description giving in that article. But unless you consider not liking to party all night as an abnormality in social interaction, none of them have anything to do with the actual symptomes of autism or Asperger.

As for the 'more susceptible to flights of insight and intelligence, but also more susceptible to flights of emotion and rage', I have no idea where you even got that. There's nothing like that in the article, nor in any other description of introvert I've read. I don't recognise myself in it either; while I do have 'aha'-experiences sometimes, they are usually the result of a long thinking proces, not 'flights'. For the second part, it works even less, as I'm a pretty controled person. Of course I get mad sometimes, but it's nowhere near above average, and it takes a lot to get me yelling.

tl;dr: Of course being introvert is not a superpower (where did he even say that?), but you shouldn't be so fast to call people disabled. And no, it's not the same as being low-key, I can be extremely outgoing with friends - for a limited amount of time.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2013, 04:42:27 PM by NeeNee »

Offline earthforge

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Re: Re: Once upon a time on the internet
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2013, 08:54:22 PM »
^ I don't really get what you're saying, but I sure as hell hope you're not calling being introvert a mental disability, because I'd take that as a personal insult.

You misread me. That's why I said the author is overloading terms. Basically, the author is conflating a select few autism spectrum disorder symptoms with introverted behaviors.

Quote
Yes, I do hate chaos. Yes, I need to get away from crowds. I fit every single description giving in that article.

So did I. But that doesn't mean it qualifies as a diagnosis for anything. Introverted behavior is simply focusing a little more internally versus externally.

The site is like a fortune-teller or a horoscope - the words are intended to make people think that it qualifies them under the guise that it makes you special.

Quote
But unless you consider not liking to party all night as an abnormality in social interaction, none of them have anything to do with the actual symptomes of autism or Asperger.

You mistake me. There are some people who literally cannot handle parties. I don't like parties but I can attend them. My autistic colleague can't. She can't take the sensory overload and goes into a form of breakdown or shutdown. That's where there is a literal inability to handle it.

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As for the 'more susceptible to flights of insight and intelligence, but also more susceptible to flights of emotion and rage', I have no idea where you even got that.

I was talking about emotional disorders there, actually. I'm sorry if I sounded like I was generalizing a group. But I have observed this in schizophrenic and autistic cases. I was speaking to a movement that wants to make a mental disorder into a superpower to overcome the disappointment of having a real structural defect.

Quote
There's nothing like that in the article,

Quote from: Article
These myths sound exactly like the traits of Autism / Asperger Syndrome. Have you ever been evaluated for these?
Not officially. But lately I’m starting to be OK with viewing myself that way. However, if this list fits the description of Autism / Asperger Syndrome, then it would seem there is a very large population of women with Autism / Asperger Syndrome out there. I get a lot of daily thank you emails from “seemingly neuro-typical” moms and grandmothers telling me how perfectly my list described them. But I’m no expert. I personally suspect that if more people had Autism / Asperger Syndrome, the world would be a better place. Check out Wrong Planet. Kudos to them!

Yes. Yes there was.

Quote
I don't recognise myself in it either; while I do have 'aha'-experiences sometimes, they are usually the result of a long thinking proces, not 'flights'. For the second part, it works even less, as I'm a pretty controled person. Of course I get mad sometimes, but it's nowhere near above average, and it takes a lot to get me yelling.

tl;dr: Of course being introvert is not a superpower (where did he even say that?), but you shouldn't be so fast to call people disabled. And no, it's not the same as being low-key, I can be extremely outgoing with friends - for a limited amount of time.


Oi. This is because the site used weasel words in an attempt to lure you into a sense of "oh, I fit all the criterion, I must be an introvert". First, I prefer a preponderance of evidence with references to support that. Second, I dislike how overgeneral the wording is.

I dislike parties. I have a select few friends. I consider myself to be individualistic. I pay attention to myself mainly. I am blunt and sarcastic and can't do social pleasantries to save my bacon.

But I participate in parties and get-togethers (and hate it, but I have no flipping choice). I technically have many colleagues. I don't appear to be individualistic to people because challenging their paradigms is like slicing my knee in a shark tank. I try to avoid being blunt and sarcastic because sometimes I am too sharp or the other person is too sensitive. I will imitate the social pleasantries and adapt.

The website is too broad. It can't handle complexity. It lures people into a false sense of belonging to a made-up group.

Uniqueness is a combo of heritage, chance, experiences and choices. Not just because you are an introvert. Not just because I am a university student.
"There are no answers. Only choices."

Offline NeeNee

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Re: Re: Once upon a time on the internet
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2013, 10:11:18 PM »
^ I don't really get what you're saying, but I sure as hell hope you're not calling being introvert a mental disability, because I'd take that as a personal insult.

You misread me. That's why I said the author is overloading terms. Basically, the author is conflating a select few autism spectrum disorder symptoms with introverted behaviors.
Like which?

Quote
Quote
Yes, I do hate chaos. Yes, I need to get away from crowds. I fit every single description giving in that article.

So did I. But that doesn't mean it qualifies as a diagnosis for anything. Introverted behavior is simply focusing a little more internally versus externally.
Diagnosis? It's a personality type, not a freaking disease.

What's wrong with saying that I fit the description of a personality type?

Quote
The site is like a fortune-teller or a horoscope - the words are intended to make people think that it qualifies them under the guise that it makes you special.
It is?

I thought it was meant to clear up some misconceptions about introverts. Because that's what he does. Because many people really think that everyone who doesn't like parties must be shy or awkward or whatever.

Quote
Quote
But unless you consider not liking to party all night as an abnormality in social interaction, none of them have anything to do with the actual symptomes of autism or Asperger.

You mistake me. There are some people who literally cannot handle parties. I don't like parties but I can attend them. My autistic colleague can't. She can't take the sensory overload and goes into a form of breakdown or shutdown. That's where there is a literal inability to handle it.
Yes, and that's why she has an actual disorder and 'normal' introverts don't.

That was exactly my point: there are no actual symptomes of autism or Asperger in the article, because having autism and being introvert is not the same thing.

Quote
Quote
As for the 'more susceptible to flights of insight and intelligence, but also more susceptible to flights of emotion and rage', I have no idea where you even got that.

I was talking about emotional disorders there, actually. I'm sorry if I sounded like I was generalizing a group. But I have observed this in schizophrenic and autistic cases. I was speaking to a movement that wants to make a mental disorder into a superpower to overcome the disappointment of having a real structural defect.
Again, being introvert is not a disorder. You are confusing two completely different things here.

Quote
Quote
There's nothing like that in the article,

Quote from: Article
These myths sound exactly like the traits of Autism / Asperger Syndrome. Have you ever been evaluated for these?
Not officially. But lately I’m starting to be OK with viewing myself that way. However, if this list fits the description of Autism / Asperger Syndrome, then it would seem there is a very large population of women with Autism / Asperger Syndrome out there. I get a lot of daily thank you emails from “seemingly neuro-typical” moms and grandmothers telling me how perfectly my list described them. But I’m no expert. I personally suspect that if more people had Autism / Asperger Syndrome, the world would be a better place. Check out Wrong Planet. Kudos to them!

Yes. Yes there was.
You'll have to be more specific, because I don't see it.

Where does it mention 'flights of insight and intelligence'? Where are the 'flights of emotion and rage'? The only thing he's saying is that if he has Asperger, loads of seemingly normal woman ('neuro-typical' means normal, btw) would have it too.

Quote
Quote
I don't recognise myself in it either; while I do have 'aha'-experiences sometimes, they are usually the result of a long thinking proces, not 'flights'. For the second part, it works even less, as I'm a pretty controled person. Of course I get mad sometimes, but it's nowhere near above average, and it takes a lot to get me yelling.

tl;dr: Of course being introvert is not a superpower (where did he even say that?), but you shouldn't be so fast to call people disabled. And no, it's not the same as being low-key, I can be extremely outgoing with friends - for a limited amount of time.

Oi. This is because the site used weasel words in an attempt to lure you into a sense of "oh, I fit all the criterion, I must be an introvert". First, I prefer a preponderance of evidence with references to support that. Second, I dislike how overgeneral the wording is.

I dislike parties. I have a select few friends. I consider myself to be individualistic. I pay attention to myself mainly. I am blunt and sarcastic and can't do social pleasantries to save my bacon.

But I participate in parties and get-togethers (and hate it, but I have no flipping choice). I technically have many colleagues. I don't appear to be individualistic to people because challenging their paradigms is like slicing my knee in a shark tank. I try to avoid being blunt and sarcastic because sometimes I am too sharp or the other person is too sensitive. I will imitate the social pleasantries and adapt.
Congratulations, you're an introvert.

What, are you surprised? 25% of the population are introverts. On internet forums, this is easily 50% (75% if this little test is to be believed). Given the few things I know about you, I would've been highly surprised if you were extrovert.

And no, that doesn't mean there's anything wrong with you. I don't know why you hate so much being called an introvert - it's just a rough indication of personality. Like you said, simply focusing a little more internally versus externally, and having some things in common like a distaste of parties and small talk.

Quote
The website is too broad. It can't handle complexity. It lures people into a false sense of belonging to a made-up group.

Uniqueness is a combo of heritage, chance, experiences and choices. Not just because you are an introvert. Not just because I am a university student.
Like I said, I don't see anything wrong with calling myself an introvert. It has about as much value as calling myself a cat-lover.

I do agree the author overdoes it a bit with the polarisation, but that doesn't prevent his descriptions/explanations of introvert behaviour are pretty good. That's why I quoted the article in the first place.
« Last Edit: February 02, 2013, 08:48:30 AM by NeeNee »

Offline earthforge

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Re: Re: Once upon a time on the internet
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2013, 07:23:23 AM »
^ I don't really get what you're saying, but I sure as hell hope you're not calling being introvert a mental disability, because I'd take that as a personal insult.

You misread me. That's why I said the author is overloading terms. Basically, the author is conflating a select few autism spectrum disorder symptoms with introverted behaviors.
Like which?

The explanation of introverts by describing dopamine sensitivity. I really don't think that's it. Again - the chemical explanation makes far more sense for a severe case, like my autistic colleague. Thus my conclusion.

Also the statistic that 25% of people are introverts. I doubt that. The statistic sounds more apropos for mild to severe mental illnesses in a population.

Quote
Quote
Yes, I do hate chaos. Yes, I need to get away from crowds. I fit every single description giving in that article.

So did I. But that doesn't mean it qualifies as a diagnosis for anything. Introverted behavior is simply focusing a little more internally versus externally.
Diagnosis? It's a personality type, not a freaking disease.

They gave it a shite biological rationale, which means they were the ones who put it in biological terms to begin with. They are treating it like a disorder.

Quote
The site is like a fortune-teller or a horoscope - the words are intended to make people think that it qualifies them under the guise that it makes you special.
It is?

I thought it was meant to clear up some misconceptions about introverts. Because that's what he does. Because many people really think that everyone who doesn't like parties must be shy or awkward or whatever.

Clearing up social misconceptions is no excuse for bad science.

Again, being introvert is not a disorder. You are confusing two completely different things here.

At the risk of sounding like a petulant child, the article did that first. They gave a disorder rationale. I lean towards the null hypothesis - that there's a confluence of factors that determines this, and not just one ridiculous line of argument that cross-correlates more with honest-to-god people with disorders than a wide swath of people who think similarly.

Quote
Quote
I don't recognise myself in it either; while I do have 'aha'-experiences sometimes, they are usually the result of a long thinking proces, not 'flights'. For the second part, it works even less, as I'm a pretty controled person. Of course I get mad sometimes, but it's nowhere near above average, and it takes a lot to get me yelling.

tl;dr: Of course being introvert is not a superpower (where did he even say that?), but you shouldn't be so fast to call people disabled. And no, it's not the same as being low-key, I can be extremely outgoing with friends - for a limited amount of time.

Oi. This is because the site used weasel words in an attempt to lure you into a sense of "oh, I fit all the criterion, I must be an introvert". First, I prefer a preponderance of evidence with references to support that. Second, I dislike how overgeneral the wording is.

I dislike parties. I have a select few friends. I consider myself to be individualistic. I pay attention to myself mainly. I am blunt and sarcastic and can't do social pleasantries to save my bacon.

But I participate in parties and get-togethers (and hate it, but I have no flipping choice). I technically have many colleagues. I don't appear to be individualistic to people because challenging their paradigms is like slicing my knee in a shark tank. I try to avoid being blunt and sarcastic because sometimes I am too sharp or the other person is too sensitive. I will imitate the social pleasantries and adapt.
Congratulations, you're an introvert.

Who says? You? This website? Which definition are we picking and choosing? That's the problem with these studies - the definitions are always changing.

Quote
And no, that doesn't mean there's anything wrong with you. I don't know why you hate so much being called an introvert - it's just a rough indication of personality. Like you said, simply focusing a little more internally versus externally, and having some things in common like a distaste of parties and small talk.

Actually, I just hate getting wrapped up into one little package. The personality tests are the worst offenders. All the variables are tied up in one mangled mess. The puzzle pieces are changing depending on observer bias. This website defines one type of introvert. You're defining another based on your read. I dislike the variability of the term, especially to determine something so unscientific.
"There are no answers. Only choices."

Offline NeeNee

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Re: Re: Once upon a time on the internet
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2013, 12:48:57 AM »
The explanation of introverts by describing dopamine sensitivity. I really don't think that's it. Again - the chemical explanation makes far more sense for a severe case, like my autistic colleague. Thus my conclusion.
The correlation between introvert/extravert and sensitivity to dopamine has been known for a few decades (here's an article from 1998). I'm not saying that's the only reason, but it's not like he's just making stuff up.

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Also the statistic that 25% of people are introverts. I doubt that. The statistic sounds more apropos for mild to severe mental illnesses in a population.
I think something occuring in 25% of the population is common enough to be considered normal.

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Quote
Diagnosis? It's a personality type, not a freaking disease.

They gave it a shite biological rationale, which means they were the ones who put it in biological terms to begin with. They are treating it like a disorder.
Because only disorders have a biological explanation and the rest of our behaviour hasn't?

The scientific fields of Sociobiology, Behavioral neuroscience, Evolutionary psychology and Human behavioral ecology (among others) beg to differ.

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Clearing up social misconceptions is no excuse for bad science.
True. I think it's a honorable goal by itself though.

As for the bad science, he's just repeating what others have said. I don't think you can really blame him.

Quote
Again, being introvert is not a disorder. You are confusing two completely different things here.

At the risk of sounding like a petulant child, the article did that first. They gave a disorder rationale. I lean towards the null hypothesis - that there's a confluence of factors that determines this, and not just one ridiculous line of argument that cross-correlates more with honest-to-god people with disorders than a wide swath of people who think similarly.
No, they didn't. Saying that someone is different from the majority does not equal calling them disabled. That's like saying that all black people must have skin disorder because their skin doesn't function the same way as in white folks.

It's perfectly possible to have two different ways of thinking that are both fuctional, especially when we're talking about a difference in gradation rather than structure. Think of it as a continuum:

ADHD (can't get enough stimuli; dopamine-deficient) _____ extravert (likes a lot of stimuli; low-sensitive) _____ introvert (doesn't like a lot of stimuli; high-sensitive) _____ autist (can't handle a lot of stimuli; oversensitive)

Introverts are definitely closer to the right side of the personality spectrum. But just like not everyone who likes parties has ADHD, not everyone who likes being alone is an autist. It's only called a disorder when it's seriously impairing your ability to function in society, and for most introverts that's not the case.

(Note: I'm not saying that dopamine abnormalities are the only reasons for ADHD and autism; there are many. But at least in some cases, it plays a role.)

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Congratulations, you're an introvert.

Who says? You? This website? Which definition are we picking and choosing? That's the problem with these studies - the definitions are always changing.
I was going by the most commonly accepted definitions - the kind you find in dictionaries and on Wikipedia.

It's true that the definitions have changed a little over time, but the basic idea is still the same, and I think most people can relatively easily qualify themselves as more introvert or more extrovert (unless they fall right in the middle, then it's called ambivert).

Quote
Quote
And no, that doesn't mean there's anything wrong with you. I don't know why you hate so much being called an introvert - it's just a rough indication of personality. Like you said, simply focusing a little more internally versus externally, and having some things in common like a distaste of parties and small talk.

Actually, I just hate getting wrapped up into one little package. The personality tests are the worst offenders. All the variables are tied up in one mangled mess. The puzzle pieces are changing depending on observer bias. This website defines one type of introvert. You're defining another based on your read. I dislike the variability of the term, especially to determine something so unscientific.
I see. Personally, I rather enjoy personality type test, I think it's fun to see if they get it right. Being an introvert (;D), I like thinking about my own way of thinking, and analyses like this help me with that. (I considered myself an introvert long before I read this article, btw. But I really like the way he countered some of the 'myths'.)

Offline NeeNee

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Re: Personality types
« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2013, 07:38:32 PM »
Might as well turn this into a topic about personality types.

Has anyone ever taken a Jung/Briggs Myers/Keirsey personality test? They distinguish 16 types of personalities, based on 4 different axes. Each type gets its own description, which you can find here and here. (Hint: Take the test first before looking at the results, since it might influence the way you read the questions.)

Of course, it won't work for everyone, but I think it's interesting to see how far your alleged personality type matches your actual personality. One question can change your score, so take a look at the neighbouring types too, perhaps you will find that one of them suits you better. :)

I first took the test some years ago, but I'm still in the Mastermind category (INTJ). Which is funny, because I don't work hard at all. :)) Some of the other aspects fit me to a T though, like wanting people to make sense, and prefering to stay in the background until others 'demonstrate their inability to lead', at which point I will be very tempted to step up and do it myself (it's been like that since I was a kid. None of the other types mention it, curiously). I can recognize myself in some points of the Architect description too, but the overall picture doesn't fit as well.

Offline Wikkelsoee

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Re: Personality types
« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2013, 10:39:23 AM »
Huh, turns out I'm an INTJ too :D I've always liked personality tests. They sometimes give me an idea of how other people see me.

Offline Fullmetal

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Re: Personality types
« Reply #9 on: February 08, 2013, 08:13:53 PM »
im an INFJ

Offline NeeNee

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Re: Personality types
« Reply #10 on: February 08, 2013, 08:35:26 PM »
^ I did not take you for a Counselor. :D Shows how surprising these results can be.

Can you find yourself in the description, or does it not sound like you at all?

Offline Fullmetal

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Re: Personality types
« Reply #11 on: February 09, 2013, 03:01:32 AM »
http://www.typelogic.com/infj.html

this one is pretty accurate
not to say I want to be a counselor

Offline earthforge

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Re: Personality types
« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2013, 09:20:03 AM »
INFJ.

How ridiculous. I don't know. I just find it ridiculous since it's scoring me in a silly manner. All the questions appear disconnected, and my answer to most seems to be "depends on the circumstance".

Honestly: it scores what we wish we were but really aren't.

NN, thanks for letting me know that psych really is a crackpot science.
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Offline Wikkelsoee

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Re: Personality types
« Reply #13 on: February 09, 2013, 11:31:13 AM »
Honestly: it scores what we wish we were but really aren't.

I don't mind that either. I have things about myself I don't like (I think everyone do), and if my result is how I want to be I'll know what to go after.

Offline VacuumTan

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Re: Personality types
« Reply #14 on: February 09, 2013, 12:17:29 PM »
The test gave me a headache. Reading the results did the same.

INFP.

http://www.typelogic.com/infp.html

While I'm sure I'm nothing like down-to-earth, I'm not living in some kind of fantasy-world where I'm rubbing my eraser around on the grey-grey morality until it becomes the white-grey delusion I, according to this test, wish to believe in.

Well, you can't take these things too serious anyways. Maybe one or two things with that whole result-thing could be fitting, but that's it. According to these totally professional tests on the internet I'm a Schizophrenic beyond repair, too.
As if to spite this hateful world, I decided to love it.